Cognitive-Behavioral Theories

Cognitive-Behavioral Theories

Week 7 Learning Resources

This page contains the Learning Resources for this week. Be sure to scroll down the page to see all of this week’s assigned Learning Resources.

Required Resources

Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.

Readings

·         Capuzzi, D., & Gross, D. R. (Ed). (2011). Counseling and psychotherapy: Theories and interventions. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.

o    Chapter 9, “Cognitive-Behavioral Theories” (pp. 193–213)

o    Chapter 10, “Dialectical Behavior Theory” (pp. 215–235)

o    Chapter 11, “Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy” (pp. 237–261)

o    Chapter 12, “Reality Therapy/Choice Theory” (pp. 263–285)

Note: This week’s chapters are for review, as they are the same as assigned for Week 6.

·         Document: Analyzing Counseling Theories (Word document)

Note: This document will be used for the completion of this week’s Assignment.

Media

·         Psychotherapy.net. (Executive Producer). (1997). Cognitive-behavioral therapy with John Krumboltz[Video].
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 111 minutes.

·         Psychotherapy.net. (Executive Producer). (1997). Reality therapy with Dr. Robert Wubbolding [Video].
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 110 minutes.

There are no videos for DBT or REBT in this video series.

 

Week 7 Discussion

Theory in Action: Cognitive and Behavioral Approaches

Have you ever heard the term “positive addiction”? In general, this term is used to describe the act of replacing a negative addiction, like smoking, with a positive activity, like exercising. Both smoking and exercising can be perceived as a means to reduce stress; however the act of exercising is clearly the healthier option of the two. William Glasser, the founder of reality therapy was the first to introduce this term. Glasser believed that these positive addictions can increase the strength and motivation that people feel in their lives.

Have you ever stood on a crowded elevator and considered singing a song? Did you know that this could actually be an intervention used by a cognitive-behavioral counselor called a shame-attacking exercise? In shame-attacking exercises, clients engage in an activity that others around them might disapprove of, thus causing shame to the client. Experiencing the brief discomfort caused by these actions is thought to decrease feelings of social anxiety and self-consciousness.

For this week’s Discussion, you consider which theoretical approach most resonates with you: reality therapy or a generalized CBT approach. You then watch the media piece that translates this theory into practice. Specifically, you examine how the counselor depicted in the media used your selected theoretical approach to guide his or her interventions.

Note: When crafting your Discussion post, support your ideas by providing references to specific examples from the video. In addition, cite the video frame (e.g., 8.32 minutes) that the action or intervention occurred. You do not need to summarize the demonstration itself, as your Instructor and many of your colleagues have also viewed it. Instead, provide insight into the interventions used and major constructs of the theory.

Post by Day 3 a brief description of the video you selected and the theoretical approach used. Explain how this theory resonates with you. Then, describe the counselor’s specific interventions that would indicate his/her theoretical approach and explain how effectively the counselor demonstrated the approach. Finally, share one insight you gained from watching the counselor in the media.

Respond by Day 5 to at least two of your colleagues using one or more of the following approaches:

·         Identify colleagues who selected a different theory from you. Critically appraise your colleagues’ critique of the counselor’s actions.

·         Provide insight into how another CBT theory could have been used to address this client.

 

Week 7 Assignment

Application: Analyzing Counseling Theories

This Application continues your side-by-side analysis of learning theories. Download the chart template, “Analyzing Counseling Theories,” from this week’s Learning Resources to continue your Assignment.

Part 1: Chart

·         Use the chart template to analyze counseling theories.

·         Select two theories from this week’s Learning Resources.

·         Describe the background theory, human nature, major constructs, applications, and evaluations of each counseling theory.

Part 2: Reflection (1 page)

·         Describe a specific population of clients with whom you hope to work in the future.

·         Explain which of the two theories in your chart would be the most effective in working with this client population and explain why.

·         Describe the interventions you would suggest from this theory and how these interventions would assist this client population in reaching counseling goals.

Submit your assignment by Day 7 of this week.

Submission Instructions:

Both parts of this week’s Assignment, the chart and reflection, will be submitted as one document to the Assignment link below. Use template provided.

Save your Assignment as:

·         WK7Assgn+last name+first initial.doc

Follow the submission instructions below.

Week 7 Learning Resources

This page contains the Learning Resources for this week. Be sure to scroll down the page to see all of this week’s assigned Learning Resources. To access select media resources, please use the media player below.

Required Resources

Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.

Readings

·         Ivey, A. E., Bradford Ivey, M., & Zalaquett, C. P.  (2016). Essentials of intentional interviewing: Counseling in a multicultural world (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage.

o    Chapter 9, “Empathic Confrontation” (pp. 178-197)

·         Jacobs, E., & Schimmel, C. (2013). Impact therapy: The courage to counsel.

·         Chapter 4, “Ways to Have Impact”

·         Chapter 5, “Rapport”

·         Chapter 6, “Contract”

·         Strong, T., & Zeman, D. (2010). Dialogic considerations of confrontation as a counseling activity: An examination of Allen Ivey’s use of confronting as a microskill. Journal of Counseling & Development, 88(3), 332–339.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

·         Document: Skills for Week 8 Mock Counseling Video

Media

·         Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010f). Counseling techniques — micro-skills III. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 32 minutes.

Week 7 Discussion

Culture and Nonverbal Communication

In everyday conversation, you probably find yourself pausing, listening, and reflecting on what the other person is saying. These naturally occurring moments of silence are arguably as important to the communication process as the spoken words are. Counseling sessions are no different—it is often an appropriate technique to sit in silence with your client(s). For example, a counselor may remain silent in order to allow a client to ponder what she or he just said or to facilitate smooth transitions between topics and a natural progression of clients’ thoughts. Silence may be used effectively in conjunction with other nonverbal skills, such as body language and eye contact, to build the therapeutic alliance. On the other hand, abrupt silences and prolonged unproductive silence can damage that alliance.

For this Discussion, review this week’s Learning Resources and consider how and when you might use silence to benefit a client.

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