Relationships During Adulthood

Relationships During Adulthood

Please no plagiarism and make sure you are able to access all resource on your own before you bid. One of the references must come from Broderick and Blewitt (2015). I need this completed by 01/24/18 at 6pm and thorough.

Discussion 2: Relationships During Adulthood

Pair bonding is globally acknowledged as the life-long, monogamous relationship that many individuals strive to achieve. With roots in attachment theory, pair bonding in adulthood has been viewed as following a developmental pattern similar to that which individuals experience with primary caregivers. Fraley and Shaver (2000) noted that “adults typically feel safer and more secure when their partner is nearby, accessible, and responsive” (p. 132). A pair bond can provide a sense of security—an emotional “shelter” and safe place in which one can be vulnerable. Pair bonding is biologically driven. Its manifestations vary widely depending on individual life experiences, expectations, and constructs about self and others.

With this in mind, think about whether you believe adult pair bonding is the same as marriage. If pair bonding is a biological, innate part of being human, why might so many marriages and relationships fail?

For this Discussion, review the Learning Resources and consider influences on and motivations for pair bonding.

Post by Day 4 a description of two influences on or motivations for pair bonding. Then, explain two benefits and two challenges in maintaining stable, long-term relationships in adulthood. Be sure to include how environmental and/or socio-cultural influences impact pair bonding. Finally, explain how relationship challenges may motivate individuals to seek assistance from a counselor. Justify your response with theories from the Learning Resources and current literature.

Readings

· Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The life span: Human development for helping professionals (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

o Chapter 12, “Socioemotional and Vocational Development in Young Adulthood” (review pp. 438-476)

o Chapter 13, “Middle Adulthood: Cognitive, Personality, and Social Development” (pp. 478-525)

· Belsky, J. (2010). Childhood experience and the development of reproductive strategies. Psicothema, 22(1), 28–34.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

· Brandell, J. R. (2010). Contemporary psychoanalytic perspectives on attachment. Psychoanalytic Social Work17(2), 132–157.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

· Halrynjo, S. (2009). Men’s work-life conflict: Career, care and self-realization: Patterns of privileges and dilemmas. Gender, Work & Organization, 16(1), 98–125.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

· Kuchinke, K. P., Cornachione, E. B., Oh, S. Y., & Kang, H.-S. (2010). All work and no play? The meaning of work and work stress of mid-level managers in the United States, Brazil, and Korea. Human Resource Development International, 13(4), 393–408.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

· Newton, N., & Stewart, A. J. (2010). The middle ages: Changes in women’s personalities and social roles. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 34(1),75–84.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

· Rodriguez, P. D., & Ritchie, K. L. (2009). Relationship between coping styles and adult attachment styles. Journal of the Indiana Academy of the Social Sciences, 13, 131–141.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

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